Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Geology and Geoscience Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Geology and Geoscience Summit International Conference Keynote Speaker Zhaoliang Song photo
Biography:

Zhaoliang Song is a Professor of Institute of the Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, China. He has completed his PhD from Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests include carbon sequestration from enhanced mineral weathering, coupled biogeochemical cycles of carbon and silicon, phytolith carbon sequestration, phytolith geochemistry, phytolith and geochemical record of climate change. As a first and/or corresponding author, he has published 27 papers in SCI journals (Average IF=3.6) including 9 papers published in international top SCI journals such as Global Change Biology (IF=8.444) and Earth-Science Reviews (IF=6.991) and has been selected as experts to review papers for many SCI journals such as Plant and SoilScientific ReportsFunctional EcologyScience of the Total EnvironmentEuropean Journal of Soil Science.

Abstract:

Silicon (Si), the second abundant element on the Earth’s surface, is usually coupled with global biogeochemical carbon (C) cycle at different time-scales, and plays an important role in regulating the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Bio-available Si is absorbed by plant root and deposited within plant tissues to form phytoliths (opal-A, SiO2-nH2O) during the plant growth. A small percentage of organic carbon (0.2-5.8%) could be occluded within phytoliths (PhytOC). PhytOC is relatively stable and may be preserved in soils or sediments for many hundreds to thousands of years due to their chemical compositions, morphology and local environment conditions. Recently, the occlusion of carbon within phytoliths is considered to be one of the key important global biogeochemical C sequestration mechanisms. Here we review recent advances about the study of phytolith C sequestration and estimate the potential of phytolith C sequestration in China. This work indicates that the production rates of PhytOC among different terrestrial ecosystems in China decrease in the following order: croplands>forests>grasslands. In addition, active management measures, including mulching organic manures, fertilizing silicon, amending rock powder, cultivating Si-accumulating plants and partial harvesting of plants to maximize silicon supply and above-ground net primary production, have a significant potential to promote the phytolith C sink in China and the rest of the world. However, further studies are need to demonstrate the cost of these management measures, the exact mechanisms involved and the magnitude of C sequestration through phytoliths among various terrestrial ecosystems, and to make the C sequestration of phytoliths as one of the global important mechanisms of biogeochemical C sequestration.

Keynote Forum

Xiong Sheng-Qing

China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources, China

Keynote: Geological structures of continental China reviewed by aeromagnetic data

Time : 10:30

Geology and Geoscience Summit International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiong Sheng-Qing  photo
Biography:

Xiong Sheng-Qing is a senior Geophysicist and Professor. His research interests are in aero geophysics and remote sensing. Presently, he is the chief geoscientist at the China Aero Geophysical Survey & Remote Sensing Center for Land & Resources. 

Abstract:

Using the most advanced method of processing and mapping, the compilation of 1:1000000 series of China land aeromagnetic map has provided high quality fundamental materials of regional geophysics for the research of regional geological structures in our country, which innovates a lot upon mapping of regional aeromagnetic and geological structures, data processing technology, interpretation method and recognition of geological structures etc, also promotes the progress of scientific and technology in related field. Based on about 120000 depth data of magnetic body calculated by surveyed magnetic materials, the depth map of China land magnetic basement was compiled. We carried out research on characteristic of China land rugged magnetic basement, especially the distribution of depression and uplift, and the depth and current status of the sedimentary cover layer, which provided reference materials for the study of regional structures and prognosis of oil-gas exploration target area in China. Depending on the magnetic data, and combining the comprehensive research of gravity, geology and remote sensing data etc, we compiled distribution map of 1:2500000 China land fault and magnetic rocks, regional structure map (fig1) and series of interpretation map of geological structures, and then established the framework of fault structures; found many new faults; delineated concealed and half concealed magnetic rock body; characterized regional structural unit and its boundary; clearly illustrated the characteristics of basal lithofacies structure; evaluated the stability of basement; discussed the characteristics of deep magnetic structure and depth of magnetic layer. These maps will give blueprint for the work of geosciences and benefit a lot to the study of framework. The first aeromagnetic-geological structure maps of continental China, has significantly important reference value for the analysis of regional structures, geological background of oil-gas and mineral resources formation, the evaluation of geological environment, geological disaster and development of geosciences theory.

  • Track 1: Environmental Geology Track 2: Petroleum Geology Track 3: Geology and Mineral Resources Track Track 5: Structural Geology 10: Marine Geology Track 11: Physical Geology
Speaker
Biography:

Jincai Tuo is a Professor at Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His main research areas are oil & gas geology, application of organic geochemistry, and unconventional oil and gas resources. In recent years, more than 80 papers were published in domestic and international academic journals, including 25 papers cited by SCI and 16 papers cited by EI. He was awarded American Association of Petroleum Geologists (Foundation AAPG) Grants-in-Aid scholarship twice. He has made important achievements and great progress in hydrocarbon source rock evaluation, natural gas accumulation and shale oil and gas exploration.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Marine black shales were widely developed during the Early Cambrian (Niutitang Formation), Late Ordovician (Wufeng Formation), and Early Silurian (Longmaxi Formation) periods. Discovery of the Jiaoshiba shale gas field in southeastern margin of the Sichuan Basin marks a significant progress in the shale gas exploration in the Wufeng-Longmaxi Formation and has a guiding significance for shale gas exploration in China. Compared with the Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian shales, the Lower Cambrian Niutitang shales are more widely and stably distributed throughout southern China, and contain higher TOC with greater thermal maturity levels. Therefore, the Lower Cambrian black shales also have a promising potential of shale gas.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: In this study, Lower Paleozoic shale samples collected from Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation, Upper Ordovician Wufeng Formation, and Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in different regions in the Sichuan Basin were analyzed using geochemical and petrophysical methods to characterize the difference in organic matter properties (including abundance, type and thermal maturity), pore development, mineralogy to shale gas resources potential.

Findings: The total porosity of the lower Paleozoic marine shales displays a roughly decreasing trend with increasing age. The Lower Cambrian shales with higher TOC have pore sizes skewed toward smaller pores and lower total pore volumes, most notably pore sizes with a distribution range of less than 50 nm, whereas in the Lower Silurian shales, the pores are almost uniformly distributed over different pore sizes (micropores, mesopores and macropores).

Conclusion & Significance: The negative relationship was observed between the total porosity and the TOC and quartz contents in the three Paleozoic marine shales suggests that re-precipitated pyrobitumen (coke) created by oil cracked to gas in overmature source rocks may have led to the lowest porosity level and minimum pore sizes in the most aged but most TOC-abundant shales.

Speaker
Biography:

Qu Jili has his expertise in Engineering Geology and Geotechnique, as well as environmental protection. His prestigious research on soil modification of earth surface and detailed prediction of soil water content based on organic content and clay content creates a new pathway for improving the downsizing of remote sensing materials. He has been involved in this aspect of research for many years, being rich in experiences. The research foundation is based on the field investigation, related historic materials and compound statistic techniques. The results of his research have been used in effective land arrangement, soil modification, accurate interpretation of remote sensing data from satellites etc.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Many remote sensing data from satellites can provide frequent globe coverage of soil water content (SWC) over a large area of earth surface, but they are almost all at a relatively course resolution (>9 km).  There are numerous efforts to further downscale these products from the generally coarse resolution of (9×9 km) to field scale (~0.5 km) based on the characterization of vegetation, soil, land surface, topography and rainfall that influence the variability of SWC at the field scale. This intensive soil water content (SWC) data will enable strides in weather and climate prediction, agricultural management and improve our understanding of hydrological processes and land-surface interactions. 

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This field investigation offered key information about SWC and soil physical constitution from 52 agricultural lands to evaluate the impact of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other physical properties such as soil textural class on soil water content over a 12 week period. Cropland averaging SWC over the period of the investigation was projected in an optimum way by integration of soil texture class and SOC in every field moisture status. 

Findings: In spite of that both %Clay and SOC explained approximately 80% of variance in SWC over all cropland, respectively, soil organic carbon explained larger variation in soil water content than its other physical properties in desiccation situation. 

Conclusion: The strong association of SWC with SOC shows soil organic carbon may be a good parameter in downscaling the estimate of SWC from satellite data in particular where SWC information are unavailable or unreliable.

Speaker
Biography:

Nicola Capuano is the Professor of Geology, Regional Geology and Sedimentology. His research areas include geological and structural surveys of the Marches North, study lithostratigraphic and sedimentological of syn-orogenic basins, sedimentological analysis of the Messinian evaporite deposits of the Marche-Romagna, correlation and nomenclature of lithostratigraphic and tectonic units of the Members of the Marnoso-Arenacea outcropping in the Marche and Romagna sector and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Apennine foredeep turbidite deposits.

Abstract:

This work discusses the synsedimentary structural control affecting the pliocenic turbidites deposited in an elongate foreland basin formed in front of the growing Northern Apennines orogenic wedge. Several Pliocene marine foreland basin outcrops along the Apennine Chain. The sedimentary basin of Montecalvo-in-Foglia is located on the Pedeapennine margin, shows a synclinal structure and was formed on an active thrust. This basin is one of the better preserved cases in the Apennine chain, which originated and evolved during the later compressive tectonic phases from Late Miocene to Early Pliocene. It was completely filled by terrigenous sequence deposited during the Pliocene between 4.2-2.9 My. The stratigraphic succession records the progressive closure of the Apennine foredeep basin due to the NE propagation of thrust fronts. The foreland basin of Montecalvo-in-Foglia, confined by two adjacent thrusts systems, is characterized by two turbidite systems: one deposited during periods of highstand of sea-level, with low sedimentation rates and muddy deposits: the other, very coarse-grained with high sedimentation rates, was deposited during periods of lowstand of sea-level. High frequency tectonic uplift “events” within a short interval of time, about 1.3 My are thought to be responsible for relative sea-level lowstand. The coarseness and volume of the turbidite units appear to be related both to eustatic sea-level and/or to regional tectonism. Both factors combine to create the basic framework within which turbidite bodies were deposited. Turbidite systems reflect an alternation of thrust activity and quiescence. The regional distribution of facies and facies associations, and the orogenic trends, shows that the foreland basin was narrow, elongated (NW-SE) and confined within the Peri-Adriatic foredeep. It was characterized by an internal margin with continuous syn-sedimentary tectonic activity (slumps, cannibalistic input, allochthonous Ligurian sheets have been identified). Nevertheless, the coarse-grained turbidite facies are seen to be the result of the collapse of the shelf as well as the interaction between tectonic uplift, tilting of the depositional surfaces, and eustatic sea-level fall. The rapid sea-level fluctuations in the Pliocene probably contributed to the changes in sedimentation style, and to a significant increase in the volume of turbidity currents. It is concluded the causes of cyclicity in the coarse-grained turbidite sequence are complex. They include factors both internal and external to the sedimentary setting, such as subsidence and tectonic uplift, relative sea-level variation, climate changes during the Pliocene and global astronomical cycles.

Speaker
Biography:

Ghassan Aleqabi is a Seismology scientist. He has completed his PhD and is an expert in seismic and acoustic wave propagation and recently researched a spate of explosions that jostled Baghdad in October 2006.  His research includes crustal and upper mantle tomography from ambient noise and teleseismic earthquakes recordings. He involves in projects that focuses on the current status of earthquake monitoring in Middle East and earthquake hazard assessment of the Middle East.

Abstract:

Seismic waves travel inside and on the surface of the earth with no regard to political boarders or geography.  The Middle East today is full of seismic stations and standalone national data centers that fall short of fulfilling their potential monitoring capabilities.  For Example, North Iraq Seismological Network (NISN), Iraq Seismological Network (ISN), Jordan Seismological Observatory (JSO), Qatar Seismic Network (QSN), Saudi Arabia Geological Survey (SGS) seismic network, Oman Seismological Network (OSN), Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN), UAE National Center of Meteorology and Seismology (NCMS) and Dubai Seismic Network (DSN), Bahrain National Seismic Monitoring Station (NSMS), Iran International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), and Kandilli Observatory and Research Institute (ISK), among others, do not share data in real-time with neighboring countries as if all damaging earthquakes can only occur within the boundaries of their respective borders.  The seismic risk that a country like UAE may encounter, is from neighboring earthquakes in Iran rather than from local seismicity.  The purpose of sharing continuous seismic data in real-time is to take full advantage of a significantly expanded virtual network at no or little communication cost, since it does not require building more seismic station in each county.  Without sacrificing control over their networks, data centers carry their own seismic data processing. Seismological data centers and institutions in the Middle East may enter into bi-lateral agreements to share their data in real-time.  NISN in Iraq and JSO in Jordan are preparing to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of this virtual Middle East Seismographic Network (vMESN). vMESN objective is to virtually expand the existing countries seismic networks and enhance seismological research in the Middle East and support required civil protection activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Muhamed Fakhri Omer is a Lecturer at Geology Department-Salahaddin University in Erbil-Iraq since 2002. He got M.Sc.in 2000 and Ph.D. in 2012 at Baghdad University on Paleozoic Formations which are exposed at mountains of Northern Iraq. He is expert in cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscopy that was obtained through three months training course at Aarhus University in Denmark in 2011. He got Postdoctoral scholarships for one year at Warsaw University, Poland in 2014. He participated in many local and international conferences with oral presentations; the last one was the 2nd international conference on GEOShale held in Warsaw (Poland) in September 2014. He published many papers in the Journal of African Earth Science in 2014 and 2015. He has been serving as a reviewer in many international journals.

Abstract:

The Khabour formation is the oldest exposed rock unit in Iraq (Ordovician) and was studied in two sections at Chalky Nasara and Ora localities Northern Iraq. It is comprised of 806 thick sandstone-shale cyclic alternations. The formation sediment in type locality Chalky Nasara section can be divided into three main units A, B and C, depending on the kinds of sediments, vertical changes and the sedimentary structures. These three units also can be divided into numbers of main facies. Combined lithofacies/ichnofacies analysis of the Khabour formation allows recognition of 8 facies associations from type locality and subdivided into 23 facies. The prodelta deposits are mainly characterized by heterolithic strata (wavy and lenticular bedded), the trace fossils assemblages is dominated by deposits-feeder burrows skolithos Thalassinoids isp, Planolites isp, and Macaronichnus. isp. The delta front deposits consists of (planar cross-bedded, thick-bedded, very large scale and tabular cross-bedded) sandstone facies. Wave and storm dominated deposits are found in Khabour formation, including sands deposited by storm-generated, wind driven currents, by low to high intensity oscillatory flows, and by storm-initiated density flows, which deposits upper, middle and lower shoreface. Changing of sea level during (TST) coupled with upwelling currents created starved settings which was favorable for the deposition of thin to medium bedded of phosphatic sandstone associated with a black shale pristine phosphorite in Chalky Nasara section.  Lowering of wave base during relative sea-level fall reworked pristine facies into granular deposits and produce phosphatic large-scale planar cross-bedded sandstone in Ora section. The age of the formation is determined according to recognize three ichnotaxa of cruziana including Goldfussi, Furcifera and Rugosa Isp. This reflects upper tremadocian stages of lower ordovician for the formation.

Speaker
Biography:

Yasemin Korkusuz Öztürk is a Geophysicist with a background of physics. She has been recently involved in TRIDEC, CTBTO, MARSITE, ASTARTE FP7 European Union and MarDIM (Satreps), Turk-Japan projects. She has expertise on "3D and 2D Dynamic earthquake rupture simulations based on BIEMs and FDMs" and "analysis of seismotectonics of the Marmara Region, via sensitive individual and relative earthquake locations, focal mechanism solutions and stress tensor analyses". She also has experience on kinematic earthquake rupture modeling. She currently works for the achievement of 3D dynamic earthquake rupture simulations in the Marmara Sea concerning non-planar and heterogeneous fault structures through the MarDIM project. She also works as a researcher in the department of Geophysics and basic disaster awareness educator (as a volunteer) in the Basic Disaster Awareness Unit, in Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Boğaziçi University.

Abstract:

Extensional focal mechanism solutions are mostly observed in the Central Marmara by this comprehensive research although the main Marmara Fault, the western branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), is dominated by a right lateral strike-slip regime. Marmara Region is a seismically very active area. The 1912 Mürefte and 1999 Izmit earthquakes are the last devastating earthquakes of the western and eastern sections of it, respectively. The region between these earthquakes, close to Istanbul, is prone to a large earthquake. Therefore, the analysis of the Marmara Sea is significant.

The goal of this research is to determine earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanism solutions accurately, hence obtain recent states of stresses in the Marmara Region. Accordingly, this research aims to define branches of fault structures and their geometrical orientations. In this study, six clusters of earthquakes are located using hypocenter program. Next, they are submitted to the stress tensor inversion procedure and their simultaneous focal mechanism solutions are obtained. Besides, they are relocated one again using HYPODD relative location technique. Consequently, from the comparison of relocation results of hypocenter and HYPODD programs, it is found out that most of the relocations have the same orientations due to the usage of a high quality data set. Dipping angles of the segments of the Main Marmara Fault could not be observed; on the other hand,  important information is discovered about seismogenic zones. Besides, mostly NE-SW oriented extensional stress structures are  found in the five regions, while a right lateral strike-slip stress structure is found in the most western Marmara. Further, our sensitive relocation and stress analyses will make an important contribution to a better understanding of the fault movements of the Sea of Marmara, and shed light on earthquake rupture analyses for heterogeneous stress states and other seismological studies.

Speaker
Biography:

Nageh A Obaidalla is a Professor of Stratigraphy and Micropaleontology at the Department of Geological Sciences, Assiut University, Egypt. He has received his PhD in 1993 at the University of Assiut. His research interests include the upper cretaceous-paleogene stratigraphy and marine micropaleontology of Egypt. His interests are with the regional Paleocene-lower Eocene stratigraphy, planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Egypt and the Neogene stratigraphy of the Nile Delta. He earned his geological expertise through field studies in several provinces of Egypt. In the last ten years, he has directed his investigations towards the stratigraphically tectonic events such as the Cretaceous/Paleogene, the Danian/Selandian and the Paleocene/Eocene events.

Abstract:

This work depends on the detail field, litho- and bio-stratigraphic studies on the Lower Paleogene succession of nine stratigraphic sections in Sinai, Egypt. These sections are nearly arranged in a geologic profile from north to south direction (e.g. Al-Hasanah, Sahabah, Sudr Al-Hitan, Al-Thamad, Wadi Sudr, Abu Qada, Wadi Matulla, Wadi Nukhul and Wadi Feiran). Lithostratigraphically, the studied sections are composed of five rock units namely, Sudr (uppemostpart), Dakhla, Tarawan, Esna (El-Hanadi, El-Dababiya, El-Mahmiya and Abu Had members) and Thebes formations. The vertical contacts of the rock units are gradational or intercalation in some sections and sharp at the others. Moreover, a paleosol and an erosive surface are recorded at the formational boundaries. Biostratigraphically, a general planktonic foraminiferal zonal scheme consists of eighteen zones is constructed for the Lower Paleogene strata. Some of these zones are absent in the studied sections. Based on the field and stratigraphic criteria, three remarkable tectonic events related to the Syrian Arc Orogeny are recognized. These tectonic events correspond to the Cretaceous/Paleogene, the Danian/Selandian and the Paleocene/Eocene boundaries respectively. The magnitude of these tectonic events varies in the different localities in Sinai. The Cretaceous/Paleogene event led to the missing of the lowermost part of Danian sediments. The Danian/Selandian and Paleocene/Eocene events are lithostratigraphically evidenced by the missing of Qreiya Beds and El Dababiya Quarry Member respectively. Moreover, the Paleocene/Eocene event led to the missing of the upper part of the Thanetian and the lower part of the Ypressian sediments at some section and replaced by a paleosol and an erosive surface. It subdivided the Sinai into two sedimentary sub-basins in the north and south isolated by huge aerial paleohigh which extends from Sudr Al-Hitan in the north to Abu Qada in the south.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Groundwater is the main source for land development in the Arabian Gulf countries particularly in the United Arab Emirates. To investigate the influence of geological structures on groundwater flow and accumulation, we used a set of multi-sources remote sensing data in a GIS to map fault zones and drainage pattern and spatially analyze their association with groundwater quantity and quality in Al Jaaw Plain, Al Ain, UAE.  As a first step, the remote sensing data were spatially and atmospherically corrected and enhanced by applying a set of convolution filters. After that, the main fault zones and drainage pattern were extracted manually and automatically from SAR images and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM). These features were brought into a GIS environment to correlate them against groundwater data (e.g. hydraulic head, thickness aquifer, and groundwater salinity). The results of the study show that the drainage pattern, thickness of the aquifer, and topography are structural controlled by NNW– SSE, NE–SW, and ENE–WSW trending fault zones, significantly influencing the groundwater flow and groundwater quality in Al Jaaw Plain. The results also show the groundwater flow follow the trends of fault zones  and the groundwater quality increases as the flow length increases from the east to the west. 

Tong Jing

China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources, China

Title: A study on Marine strata thickness of South Yellow Sea based on the latest aeromagnetic and airborne gravity data
Speaker
Biography:

 

Tong Jing is an engineer in Geophysics and a doctoral student in China University of Geosciences. Her research interests are in aeromagnetic and airborne gravity data processing and geological interpretation in China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources (AGRS).

Abstract:

The South Yellow Sea is commonly assumed to be located in the northeast lower Yangtze block of the South China plate, and is bounded to the west by the Tanlu Fault, and to the north by the Sujiao–Qianliyan–Linjin orogenic belt, which is a large superposed basin composed of Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine sedimentary basin and Mesozoic-Cenozoic terringenous sedimentary basin developed on the crystalline basement of pre-Sinian age. The Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine sedimentary strata formed and evolved starting from Jinning movement and ending with Yindosinian and Yanshanian movements, among which, Sinian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Carboniferous, Permian, Triassic strata have been developed. Over more than 50 years oil-gas investigation of SYSB, it is much clearer to know about the feature of terringenous sedimentary basin, but the recognition on the thickness of Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine strata has not yet reached agreement for the lack of drilling data in Paleozoic age, which limits the progress of prospecting and investigation of oil-gas resources of the South Yellow Sea.

The Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine strata of the South Yellow Sea had attracted increasing attention of scholars because of the effective seismic reflection of Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine strata. Extensive geological and geophysical investigations and research has been carried out recently. Currently, seismic prospecting is the main exploration tool. However, even sophisticated seismic data analysis, has failed to identify the distribution of complete marine strata of whole region, and more importantly, has been unable to clarify different aspects of its tectonic evolution stage. Many others studied marine sedimentary basin based on gravity and magnetic data, however, they mainly focused on the basement of basin but less for the marine strata distribution, and no one has systematically discussed the feature of Paleozoic-Mesozoic marine strata using aeromagnetic and aero gravity data. The study calculated the depth of upper and lower marine stratigraphic interface using the tangent method based on the latest acquired high precision aeromagnetic and airborne gravity data with constrain of drilling data covering the latitude of 31°to 37°and longitude of 120°to124°. It is indicated that the Mesozoic-Paleozoic marine strata mainly existed in the Central and Wunansha uplift region with the maximum thickness up to 10 km (fig1), which has been proved to be the most prospective oil-gas area of the Southern Yellow Sea.